Ilocos, the Philippines: Travel/Tourist Information Guide

Top things to do          Nightlife, Bars & Clubs           Accommodation           Tours & Excursions          Getting around / Transport

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Ilocos is the northeastern region of Luzon Island in the Philippines, occupying a narrow plain between the South China Sea and Cordillera Central mountains.. The region is divided into two provinces, Ilocos Norte and Ilocos Sur. Laoag city is the regional capital of Ilocos . The area has a rich history since it has been a colony of several different countries, including China, India and Spain. There are many architectural monuments to be seen here as well as museums and traditional heritage spots.

Nearby areas are Vigan, San Fernando de la Union, Laoag, Bollinao, Dagupan or Pagudpud with beautiful beaches and coastal areas. Great natural areas to see are the La Paz Sand Dunes, where one can witness beautiful geological formations and Lingayen Gulf which is the most notable body of water in Ilocos and is home to the Hundred Islands National Park. Of course, being a Spanish colony in bygone times, means that Ilocos has numerous well ornate catholic churches such as the Church of St. Augustine.

Ilocos also offers a vibrant nightlife within its big cities like Laoag and Vegan City. This region of the Philippines is easily accessed by bus or plane and the good variety of accommodation options available, is sure to please everyone’s needs.

Gold mines have put Ilocos on the map long before the Spanish had arrived. The indigenous inhabitants had frequent trades with Chinese and Japanese merchants. On June 13, 1592 the Spanish conquest had landed in Vigan city. The colonization process that followed saw a high number of churches and bell towers raised across this region. However the colonization was never completely successful, with several revolts by the Ilocanos. In 1818, the region was split into Ilocos Norte and Ilocos Sur in an effort to gain more political control.

The climate in Ilocos is generally dry, with a more humid environment in the south.