Guadalajara, Mexico: Travel/Tourist Information Guide

Top things to do          Nightlife, Bars & Clubs           Accommodation           Tours & Excursions          Getting around / Transport

mexico-guadalajara-charreada-horsesmexico-guadalajara-folk-art-gallerymexico-guadalajara-guanajuato-city-daytimemexico-guadalajara-jalisco-is-culture-festivalmexico-guadalajara-lago-de-chapala-sunsetmexico-guadalajara-metropolitan-cathedral-side-view-daytimemexico-guadalajara-night-photo-mexican-flag-colorsmexico-guadalajara-tequila-trail-tour

Situated 300 miles northwest of Mexico City, Guadalajara is the 2nd largest city in Mexico, with a population of over 4.3 million people. The city used to be the colonial capital of the country, and played an important role in shaping its history. Guadalajara’s contributions to Mexican culture and lifestyle include mariachi music, the sombrero, Mexican hat dancing, charreadas (rodeos) and tequila. Today it’s known for some of Mexico’s finest cuisine.

Numerous lodging options are located in the city’s Centro Histórico (Historical Center). Getting around Guadalajara can seem pretty overwhelming, at first, but it’s actually pretty easy, in spite of the city’s size.

The city was originally established in five other places, before finally setting in its current location. Previous settlements, bearing the same name, were unsuccessful due to water shortage and attacks by the natives. Guadalajara was moved for the last time in 1542 to a more defensible area in the Valley of Atemajac, where it stands to this day.

The city’s Historical Center, with its many colonial relics, hosts some of its top attractions, while the modern Chapultepec area is filled with coffeehouses, nightclubs and restaurants. The suburbs of Tlaquepaque and Tonala are a dream for folk-art shoppers and Zapopan is considered the city’s “Beverly Hills”. Many curiosities, like the historic town of Tequila, await visitors venturing outside Guadalajara for an interesting day trip.