Valletta City, Malta: Travel Tourist Information Guide

Top things to do        Nightlife, Bars & Clubs        Accommodation        Tours & Excursions        Getting around / Transport

malta-valletta-dome-of-the-carmelite-churchmalta-valletta-historic-center-rooftops-from-waterfrontmalta-valletta-republic-streetmalta-valletta-st-johns-cathedral-central-aislemalta-valletta-the-enclosed-balconies-in-narrow-streetmalta-valletta-colorful-housesmalta-valletta-seaviewmalta-valletta-street

Valletta is Malta's capital city: a living, working city, the administrative and commercial heart of the Islands. Set at the crossroads of the Mediterranean, Valletta is one of Europe’s great architectural showpieces. It’s often described as an open-air museum because it still stands as one of the world’s best preserved fortified cities. The city was originally established for military and strategic reasons by the Order of St. John, in the 16th century, but was later embellished into a fine showcase of baroque decorative art.

Apart from historical and cultural points of interest, there’s also plenty in the way of modern attractions, and Valletta’s new cafés, bars and restaurants have helped refresh its previous image as a staid sun spot. Some great boutique hotels and self-catering accommodation options have also helped attract a more sophisticated crowd, and there are many outdoor pursuits to enjoy, from sailing to cycling.

As cities go, Valletta is tiny. It measures less than 1 sq. km and you can walk across its widest point in less than 20 minutes. In contrast, however, its spectacular Grand Harbor, that stretches from the capital to the neighboring peninsula where Cottonera is placed, is the biggest in the Mediterranean.

Valletta, like the entire country, features a Mediterranean climate with warm, dry summers and mild, wet winters. Summer is delightful for guaranteed bright blue skies and perfect Mediterranean Sea. This is the ideal time for sunbathing, swimming, diving and boat trips, as well as for local festivals.