Rome, Italy: Travel/Tourist Information Guide

Top things to do          Nightlife, Bars & Clubs           Accommodation           Tours & Excursions          Getting around / Transport

Rome

Known as “The Eternal City”, Rome is one of the most important cities in human history, and is among the most popular cities for tourists.
Millions of tourists swarm up to the Italy’s capital every year to see what it has to offer.

 

Bridge on the Tiber riverColosseum at nightModern city centreMonument to Vittorio Emanuele IINight-time view of bridge on TiberFountain at Spanish StepsThe Roman Forum ruinsSt Paul's Square in Vatican City

History and significance of Rome

Rome is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world, and it had long been the seat of the greatest military and economical power in the ancient world. The capital of the great Roman Empire, it has given the world some of its greatest emperors, philosophers, scientists, painters, artists, and other prominent people.

Today, it is a vibrant city, perhaps less powerful than in the ancient times, but still the center of the world for millions of the Roman Catholic religious pilgrims, and it has been ever since 33. A.C., when the first Pope, St Paul, decided to seat the Holly See here, in the place now known as St Paul’s Square in Vatican City.

Sitting on the Tiber river, with over 2.9 million residents, it is also the capital of the Lazio region. It was, and still is, a blend of different cultures and styles- from ancient, through medieval, renaissance, baroque, neoclassicism, even fascits, to the most recent modern styles.

Basilica di San PietroColosseum seen from roof topRome seen from castleModern day intersection in a Rome streetModern square in the centre of RomeStreet with parked cars in RomePiazza Navona SquareStreet across Hotel Forum

Throughout the ages and even millenniums, Rome has preserved and added its most important landmarks and now offers them to the curious tourist from all over the world.

 

Modern day Rome

Rome today remains the most influential Italian city, in regards to both political and economic influence. Numerous international headquarters, government ministries, conference centers, sports venues and museums are located in Rome's principal business districts: the Esposizione Universale Roma; the Torrino; the Magliana; the Parco de' Medici-Laurentina, and the Tiburtina-valley. Not surprisingly, the city’s economy depends mostly on tourism. Other important branches of Rome’s industry are engineering, filming, clothing, and chemical industry.
During World War II, the fascist dictator of Italy Benito Mussolini allied the country with Nazi Germany, and declared a New Empire. After the execution of Mussolini and the end of the war, a 1946 referendum abolished the monarchy in favor of the Italian Republic.

 

Fountain at Piazza del ViminaleFountains at Villa d'EstePart of a Roman fountainSanta Sabina Basilica's fountainItalian Parliament where Mussolini would give speaches fromNaiadis fountain in RomeLower House of the Italian ParliamentTivoli fountain

Rome today remains the most influential Italian city, in regards to both political and economic influence. Numerous international headquarters, government ministries, conference centers, sports venues and museums are located in Rome's principal business districts: the Esposizione Universale Roma; the Torrino; the Magliana; the Parco de' Medici-Laurentina, and the Tiburtina-valley. Not surprisingly, the city’s economy depends mostly on tourism. Other important branches of Rome’s industry are engineering, technics, filming, clothing, and chemical industry.

During World War II, the fascist dictator of Italy Benito Mussolini allied the country with Nazi Germany, and declared a New Empire. After the execution of Mussolini and the end of the war, a 1946 referendum abolished the monarchy in favor of the Italian Republic.